Utah Department of Administrative Services Division of Administrative Rules

Utah Administrative Code

The Utah Administrative Code is the body of all effective administrative rules as compiled and organized by the Division of Administrative Rules (Subsection 63G-3-102(5); see also Sections 63G-3-701 and 702).

NOTE: For a list of rules that have been made effective since July 1, 2014, please see the codification segue page.

NOTE TO RULEFILING AGENCIES: Use the RTF version for submitting rule changes.


R33. Administrative Services, Purchasing and General Services.

Rule R33-3. Source Selection and Contract Formation.

As in effect on July 1, 2014

Table of Contents

R33-3-1. Competitive Sealed Bidding; Multi-Step Sealed Bidding.

3-101 Content of the Invitation For Bids.

(1) Use. The Invitation for Bids is used to initiate a competitive sealed bid procurement.

(2) Content. The Invitation for Bids include the following:

(a) Instructions and information to bidders concerning the bid submission requirements, including the time and closing date for submission of bids, the address of the office to which bids are to be delivered, and any other special information;

(b) The purchase description, evaluation factors, delivery or performance schedule, and inspection and acceptance requirements not included in the purchase description;

(c) The contract terms and conditions, including warranty and bonding or other security requirements, as applicable.

(3) Incorporation by Reference. The Invitation for Bids may incorporate documents by reference provided that the Invitation for Bids specifies where the documents can be obtained.

(4) Acknowledgement of Amendments. The Invitation for Bids shall require the acknowledgement of the receipt of all amendments issued.

(5) Technology Acquisitions. The Invitation for Bids may state that at any time during the term of a contract, the acquiring agency may undertake a review in consultation with the Utah Technology Advisory Board and the Department of Technology Services to determine whether a new technology exists that is in the best interest of the acquiring agency, taking into consideration cost, life-cycle, references, current customers, and other factors and that the acquiring agency reserves the right to:

(a) negotiate with the contractor for the new technology, provided the new technology is substantially within the original scope of work;

(b) terminate the contract in accordance with the existing contract terms and conditions; or

(c) conduct a new procurement for an additional or supplemental contract as needed to take into account new technology.

3-102 Bidding Time. Bidding time is the period of time between the date of distribution of the Invitation for Bids and the date set for opening of bids. In each case bidding time will be set to provide bidders a reasonable time to prepare their bids. A minimum of 10 calendar days shall be provided unless a shorter time is deemed necessary for a particular procurement as determined in writing by the Chief Procurement Officer.

3-103 Bidder Submissions.

(1) Bid Form. The Invitation for Bids shall provide a form which shall include space in which the bid price shall be inserted and which the bidder shall sign and submit along with all other necessary submissions.

(2) Electronic Bids. The Invitation for Bids may state that electronic bids will be considered whenever they are received at the designated office by the time specified for bid opening.

(3) Bid Samples and Descriptive Literature.

(a) Descriptive literature means information available in the ordinary course of business which shows the characteristics, construction, or operation of an item and assists the purchasing agency in considering whether the item meets requirements or criteria set forth in the invitation.

(b) Bid sample means a sample to be furnished by a bidder to show the characteristics of the item offered in the bid.

(c) Bid samples or descriptive literature may be required when it is necessary to evaluate required characteristics of the items bid.

(d) Samples of items, when called for in the Invitation for Bids, must be furnished free of expense, and if not destroyed by testing, will upon request, be returned at the bidder's expense. Samples submitted by the successful bidder may be held for comparison with merchandise furnished and will not necessarily be returned. Samples must be labeled or otherwise identified as called for by the purchasing agency.

(4) Bid Security. Bid and performance bonds or other security may be required for supply contracts or service contracts as the procurement officer deems advisable to protect the interests of the purchasing agency. Any requirements must be set forth in the solicitation. Bid or performance bonds should not be used as a substitute for a determination of bidder or offeror responsibility.

(5) Bid Price. Bid prices submitted in response to an invitation for bids must stand alone and may not be dependent upon a bid submitted by any other bidder. A bid reliant upon the submission of another bidder will not be considered for award.

3-104 Public Notice.

(1) Distribution. Invitation for Bids or notices of the availability of Invitation for Bids shall be mailed or otherwise furnished to a sufficient number of bidders for the purpose of securing reasonable competition. Notices of availability shall indicate where, when, and for how long Invitation for Bids may be obtained; generally describe the supply, service, or construction desired; and may contain other appropriate information. Where appropriate, the procurement officer may require payment of a fee or a deposit for the supplying of the Invitation for Bids.

(2) Publication. Every procurement in excess of $50,000 shall be publicized in any or all of the following:

(a) in a newspaper of general circulation;

(b) in a newspaper of local circulation in the area pertinent to the procurement;

(c) in industry media; or

(d) in a government internet website or publication designed for giving public notice.

(3) Public Availability. A copy of the Invitation for Bids shall be made available for public inspection at the procurement officer's office.

3-105 Bidder List; Prequalification.

(1) Purpose. Lists of qualified prospective bidders may be compiled and maintained by purchasing agencies for the purpose of soliciting competition on various types of supplies, services, and construction. Qualifications for inclusion on the lists may include legal competence to contract and capabilities for production and distribution as considerations. However, solicitations shall not be restricted to prequalified suppliers, and unless otherwise provided inclusion or exclusion on the name of a business does not determine whether the business is responsible with respect to a particular procurement or otherwise capable of successfully performing a contract.

(2) Public Availability. Subject to procedures established by the procurement officer, names and addresses on bidder lists shall be available for public inspection.

3-106 Pre-Bid Conferences.

Pre-bid conferences may be conducted to explain the procurement requirements. They shall be announced to all prospective bidders known to have received an Invitation for Bids. The conference should be held long enough after the Invitation for Bids has been issued to allow bidders to become familiar with it, but sufficiently before bid opening to allow consideration of the conference results in preparing their bids. Nothing stated at the pre-bid conference shall change the Invitation for Bids unless a change is made by written amendment as provided in section 3-107 and the Invitation for Bids and the notice of the pre-bid conference shall so provide. If a written summary of the conference is deemed advisable by the procurement officer, a copy shall be supplied to all those prospective bidders known to have received an Invitation for Bids and shall be available as a public record.

3-107 Amendments to Invitation for Bids.

(1) Application. Amendments should be used to:

(a) make any changes in the Invitation for Bids including changes in quantity, purchase descriptions, delivery schedules, and opening dates;

(b) correct defects or ambiguities; or

(c) furnish to other bidders information given to one bidder if the information will assist the other bidders in submitting bids or if the lack of information would be inequitable to other bidders.

(2) Form. Amendments to Invitation for bids shall be identified as such and shall require that the bidder acknowledge receipt of all amendments issued.

(3) Distribution. Amendments shall be sent to all prospective bidders known to have received an Invitation for Bids.

(4) Timeliness. Amendments shall be distributed within a reasonable time to allow prospective bidders to consider them in preparing their bids. If the time set for bid opening will not permit proper preparation, to the extent possible the time shall be increased in the amendment or, if necessary, by telegram or telephone and confirmed in the amendment.

3-108 Pre-Opening Modification of Withdrawal of Bids.

(1) Procedure. Bids may be modified or withdrawn by written or electronic notice received in the office designated in the Invitation for Bids prior to the time set for bid opening.

(2) Disposition of Bid Security. Bid security, if any, shall be returned to the bidder when withdrawal of the bid is permitted.

(3) Records. All documents relating to the modification or withdrawal of bids shall be made a part of the appropriate procurement file.

3-109 Late Bids, Late Withdrawals, and Late Modifications.

(1) Definition. Any bid, withdrawal, or modification received at the address designated in the Invitation for Bids after the time and date set for opening of bids at the place designated for opening is late.

(2) Treatment. No late bid, late modification, or late withdrawal will be considered unless received before contract award, and the bid, modification, or withdrawal would have been timely but for the action or inaction of personnel directly serving the procurement activity.

(3) Records. Records equivalent to those required in section 3-108 (3) shall be made and kept for each late bid, late modification, or late withdrawal.

3-110 Receipt, Opening, and Recording of Bids.

(1) Receipt. Upon receipt, all bids and modifications will be time stamped, but not opened. Bids submitted through electronic means shall be received in such a manner that the time and date of submittal, along with the contents of such bids shall be securely stored until the time and date set for bid opening. They shall be stored in a secure place until bid opening time.

(2) Opening and Recording. Bids and modifications shall be opened publicly, in the presence of one or more witnesses, at the time and place designated in the Invitation for Bids. The names of the bidders, the bid price, and other information as is deemed appropriate by the procurement officer, shall be read aloud or otherwise be made available. The opened bids shall be available for public inspection except to the extent the bidder designates trade secrets or other proprietary data to be confidential as set forth in subsection (3) of this section. Material so designated shall accompany the bid and shall be readily separable from the bid in order to facilitate public inspection of the nonconfidential portion of the bid. Make and model, and model or catalogue numbers of the items offered, deliveries, and terms of payment shall be publicly available at the time of bid opening regardless of any designation to the contrary. Bids submitted through electronic means shall be received in such a manner that the requirements of this section can be readily met.

(3) Confidential Data. The procurement officer shall examine the bids to determine the validity of any requests for nondisclosure of trade secrets and other proprietary data identified in writing. If the parties do not agree as to the disclosure of data, the procurement officer shall inform the bidders in writing what portions of the bids will be disclosed.

3-111 Mistakes in Bids.

(1) If a mistake is attributable to an error in judgment, the bid may not be corrected. Bid correction or withdrawal by reason of an inadvertent, nonjudgmental mistake is permissible, but at the discretion of the procurement officer and to the extent it is not contrary to the interest of the purchasing agency or the fair treatment of other bidders.

(2) Mistakes Discovered Before Opening. A bidder may correct mistakes discovered before bid opening by withdrawing or correcting the bid as provided in section 3-108.

(3) Confirmation of Bid. When it appears from a review of the bid that a mistake has been made, the bidder should be requested to confirm the bid. Situations in which confirmation should be requested include obvious, apparent errors on the face of the bid or a bid unreasonably lower than the other bids submitted. If the bidder alleges mistake, the bid may be corrected or withdrawn if the conditions set forth in subsection (1), (4) and (6) of this section are met.

(4) Mistakes Discovered After Opening But Before Award. This subsection sets forth procedures to be applied in three situations described in paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) below in which mistakes in bids are discovered after opening but before award.

(a) Minor Informalities. Minor informalities are matters of form rather than substance evident from the bid document, or insignificant mistakes that can be waived or corrected without prejudice to other bidders; that is, the effect on price, quantity, quality, delivery, or contractual conditions is not significant. The procurement officer may waive these informalities. Examples include the failure of a bidder to:

(i) return the number of signed bids required by the Invitation for Bids;

(ii) sign the bid, but only if the unsigned bid is accompanied by other material indicating the bidder's intent to be bound;

(iii) acknowledge receipt of an amendment to the Invitation for Bids, but only if:

(A) it is clear from the bid that the bidder received the amendment and intended to be bound by its terms; or

(B) the amendment involved had a negligible effect on price, quantity, quality, or delivery.

(C) Mistakes Where Intended Bid is Evident. If the mistake and the intended bid are clearly evident on the face of the bid document, the bid shall be corrected to the intended bid and may not be withdrawn. Examples of mistakes that may be clearly evident on the face of the bid document are typographical errors, errors in extending unit prices, transposition errors, and arithmetical errors.

(D) Mistakes Where Intended Bid is Not Evident. A bidder may be permitted to withdraw a low bid if:

(i) a mistake is clearly evident on the face of the bid document but the intended bid is not similarly evident; or

(ii) the bidder submits proof of evidentiary value which clearly and convincingly demonstrates that a mistake was made.

(5) Mistakes Discovered After Award. Mistakes shall not be corrected after award of the contract.

(6) Written Approval or Denial Required. The procurement officer shall approve or deny, in writing, a bidder's request to correct or withdraw a bid. Approval or denial may be so indicated on the bidder's written request for correction or withdrawal.

3-112 Bid Evaluation and Award.

(1) General. The contract is to be awarded to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder whose bid meets the requirements and criteria set forth in the Invitation for Bids. The Invitation for Bids shall set forth the requirements and criteria which will be used to determine the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. No bid shall be evaluated for any requirements or criteria that are not disclosed in the Invitation for Bids. An Invitation for Bids, a Request for Proposals, or other solicitation may be canceled, or any or all bids or proposals may be rejected, in whole or in part, when it is the best interests of the purchasing agency as determined by the purchasing agency. In the event of cancellation of the solicitation or rejection of all bids or proposals received in response to a solicitation, the reasons for cancellation or rejection shall be made a part of the bid file and shall be available for public inspection and the purchasing agency shall (a) re-solicit new bids using the same or revised specifications; or (b) withdraw the requisition for supplies or services.

(2) Responsibility and Responsiveness. Responsibility of prospective contractors is covered by subpart 3-7 of these rules. Responsiveness of bids is covered by Subsection 63G-6-103(24) and responsive bidder is defined in Subsection 63G-6-103(25).

(3) Product Acceptability. The Invitation for Bids shall set forth the evaluation criteria to be used in determining product acceptability. It may require the submission of bid samples, descriptive literature, technical data, or other material. It may also provide for:

(a) inspection or testing of a product prior to award for such characteristics as quality or workmanship;

(b) examination of such elements as appearance, finish, taste, or feel; or

(c) other examinations to determine whether it conforms with any other purchase description requirements. The acceptability evaluation is not conducted for the purpose of determining whether one bidder's item is superior to another but only to determine that a bidder's offering is acceptable as set forth in the Invitation for Bids. Any bidder's offering which does not meet the acceptability requirements shall be rejected.

(4) Determination of Lowest Bidder. Bids will be evaluated to determine overall economy for the intended use, in accordance with the evaluation criteria set forth in the Invitation for Bids. Examples of criteria include transportation cost, energy cost, ownership and other identifiable costs or life-cycle cost formulae. Evaluation factors need not be precise predictors of actual future costs, but to the extent possible the evaluation factors shall:

(a) be reasonable estimates based upon information the purchasing agency has available concerning future use; and

(b) treat all bids equitably.

(5) Extension of Time for Bid or Proposal Acceptance. After opening bids or proposals, the procurement officer may request bidders or offerors to extend the time during which their bids or proposals may be accepted, provided that, with regard to bids, no other change is permitted. The reasons for requesting an extension shall be documented.

(6) Only One Bid or Proposal Received. If only one responsive bid is received in response to an Invitation for Bids, including multi-step bidding, an award may be made to the single bidder if the procurement officer finds that the price submitted is fair and reasonable, and that either other prospective bidders had reasonable opportunity to respond, or there is not adequate time for resolicitation. Otherwise, the bid may be rejected and:

(a) new bids or offers may be solicited;

(b) the proposed procurement may be canceled; or

(c) if the procurement officer determines in writing that the need for the supply of service continues but that the price of the one bid is not fair and reasonable and there is no time for resolicitation or resolicitation would likely be futile, the procurement may then be conducted under subpart 3-4 or subpart 3-5, as appropriate.

(7) Multiple or Alternate Bids or Proposals. Unless multiple or alternate bids or offers are specifically provided for, the solicitation shall state they will not be accepted. When prohibited, the multiple or alternate bids or offers shall be rejected although a clearly indicated base bid shall be considered for award as though it were the only bid or offer submitted by the bidder or offeror. The provisions of this subsection shall be set forth in the solicitation, and if multiple or alternate bids are allowed, it shall specify their treatment.

3-113 Tie Bids.

(1) Definition. Tie bids are low responsive bids from responsible bidders that are identical in price.

(2) Award. Award shall not be made by drawing lots, except as set forth below, or by dividing business among identical bidders. In the discretion of the procurement officer, award shall be made in any permissible manner that will discourage tie bids. Procedures which may be used to discourage tie bids include:

(a) where identical low bids include the cost of delivery, award the contract to the bidder closest to the point of delivery;

(b) award the contract to the identical bidder who received the previous award and continue to award succeeding contracts to the same bidder so long as all low bids are identical;

(c) award to the identical bidder with the earliest delivery date;

(d) award to a Utah resident bidder or for a Utah produced product where other tie bids are from out of state;

(e) if price is considered excessive or for other reason the bids are unsatisfactory, reject all bids and negotiate a more favorable contract in the open market; or

(f) if no permissible method will be effective in discouraging tie bids and a written determination is made so stating, award may be made by drawing lots.

(3) Record. Records shall be made of all Invitations for Bids on which tie bids are received showing at least the following information:

(a) the Invitation for Bids;

(b) the supply, service, or construction item;

(c) all the bidders and the prices submitted; and

(d) procedure for resolving tie bids. A copy of each record shall be sent to the Attorney General if the tie bids are in excess of $50,000.

3-114 Multi-Step Sealed Bidding.

(1) Definition. Multi-step sealed bidding is a two-phase process consisting of a technical first phase composed of one or more steps in which bidders submit unpriced technical offers to be evaluated by the purchasing agency, and a second phase in which those bidders whose technical offers are determined to be acceptable during the first phase have their price bids considered. It is designed to obtain the benefits of competitive sealed bidding by award of a contract to the lowest responsive, responsible bidder, and at the same time obtain the benefits of the competitive sealed proposals procedure through the solicitation of technical offers and the conduct of discussions to arrive at technical offers and terms acceptable to the purchasing agency and suitable for competitive pricing.

(2) Use. The multi-step sealed bidding method will be used when the procurement officer deems it to the advantage of the purchasing agency. Multi-step sealed bidding will thus be used when it is considered desirable:

(a) to invite and evaluate technical offers to determine their acceptability to fulfill the purchase description requirements;

(b) to conduct discussions for the purposes of facilitating understanding of the technical offer and purchase description requirements and, where appropriate, obtain supplemental information, permit amendments of technical offers, or amend the purchase description;

(c) to accomplish subsections (a) and (b) of this section prior to soliciting priced bids; and

(d) to award the contract to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder in accordance with the competitive sealed bidding procedures.

3-115 Pre-Bid Conferences in Multi-Step Sealed Bidding.

Prior to the submission of unpriced technical offers, a pre-bid conference as contemplated by section 3-106 may be conducted by the procurement officer. The procurement officer may also hold a conference of all bidders in accordance with section 3-106 at any time during the evaluation of the unpriced technical offers.

3-116 Procedure for Phase One of Multi-Step Sealed Bidding.

(1) Form. Multi-step sealed bidding shall be initiated by the issuance of an Invitation for Bids in the form required by section 3-101. In addition to the requirements set forth in section 3-101, the multi-step Invitation for Bids shall state:

(a) that unpriced technical offers are requested;

(b) whether price bids are to be submitted at the same time as unpriced technical offers; if they are, the price bids shall be submitted in a separate sealed envelope;

(c) that it is a multi-step sealed bid procurement, and priced bids will be considered only in the second phase and only from those bidders whose unpriced technical offers are found acceptable in the first phase;

(d) the criteria to be used in the evaluation of the unpriced technical offers;

(e) that the purchasing agency, to the extent the procurement officer finds necessary, may conduct oral or written discussions of the unpriced technical offers;

(f) that bidders may designate those portions of the unpriced technical offers which contain trade secrets or other proprietary data which are to remain confidential; and

(g) that the item being procured shall be furnished generally in accordance with the bidder's technical offer as found to be finally acceptable and shall meet the requirements of the Invitation for Bids.

(2) Amendments to the Invitation for Bids. After receipt of unpriced technical offers, amendments to the Invitation for Bids shall be distributed only to bidders who submitted unpriced technical offers and they shall be allowed to submit new unpriced technical offers or to amend those submitted. If, in the opinion of the procurement officer, a contemplated amendment will significantly change the nature of the procurement, the Invitation for Bids shall be canceled in accordance with Subsection R33-3-112(1) of these rules and a new Invitation for Bids issued.

(3) Receipt and Handling of Unpriced Technical Offers. Unpriced technical offers shall be opened publicly, identifying only the names of the bidders. Technical offers and modifications shall be time stamped upon receipt and held in a secure place until the established due date. After the date established for receipt of bids, a register of bids shall be open to public inspection and shall include the name of each bidder, and a description sufficient to identify the supply, service, or construction item offered. Prior to the award of the selection of the lowest responsive and responsible bidder following phase two, technical offerors shall be shown only to purchasing agency personnel having a legitimate interest in them. Bidders may request nondisclosure of trade secrets and other proprietary data identified in writing.

(4) Evaluation of Unpriced Technical Offers. The unpriced technical offers submitted by bidders shall be evaluated solely in accordance with the criteria set forth in the Invitation for Bids. The unpriced technical offers shall be categorized as:

(a) acceptable;

(b) potentially acceptable, that is, reasonably susceptible of being made acceptable; or

(c) unacceptable. The procurement officer shall record in writing the basis for finding an offer unacceptable and make it part of the procurement file.

The procurement officer may initiate phase two of the procedure if, in the procurement officer's opinion, there are sufficient acceptable unpriced technical offers to assure effective price competition in the second phase without modification or alteration of the offers. If the procurement officer finds that this is not the case, the procurement officer shall issue an amendment to the Invitation for Bids or engage in technical discussions as set forth in subsection (5) of this section.

(5) Discussion of Unpriced Technical Offers. Discussion of its technical offer may be conducted by the procurement officer with any bidder who submits an acceptable or potentially acceptable technical offer. During the course of these discussions the procurement officer shall not disclose any information derived from one unpriced technical offer to any other bidder. Once discussions are begun, any bidder who has not been notified that its offer has been finally found unacceptable may submit supplemental information modifying or otherwise amending its technical offer at any time until the closing date established by the procurement officer. This submission may be made at the request of the procurement officer or upon the bidder's own initiative.

(6) Notice of Unacceptable Unpriced Technical Offer. When the procurement officer determines a bidder's unpriced technical offer to be unacceptable, the officer shall notify the bidder. The bidders shall not be afforded an additional opportunity to supplement technical offers.

3-117 Mistakes During Multi-Step Sealed Bidding.

Mistakes may be corrected or bids may be withdrawn during phase one:

(a) before unpriced technical offers are considered;

(b) after any discussions have commenced under section 3-116(5) (procedure for Phase One of Multi- Step Sealed Bidding, Discussion of Unpriced Technical Offers); or

(c) when responding to any amendment of the Invitation for Bids. Otherwise mistakes may be corrected or withdrawal permitted in accordance with section 3-111.

3-118 Carrying Out Phase Two.

(1) Initiation. Upon the completion of phase one, the procurement officer shall either:

(a) open price bids submitted in phase one from bidders whose unpriced technical offers were found to be acceptable; provided, however, that the offers have remained unchanged, and the Invitation for Bids has not been amended; or

(b) invite each acceptable bidder to submit a price bid.

(2) Conduct. Phase two is to be conducted as any other competitive sealed bid procurement except:

(a) as specifically set forth in section 3-114 through section 3-120 of these rules; and

(b) no public notice need be given of this invitation to submit.

3-119 Procuring Governmental Produced Supplies or Services.

Purchasing agency requirements may be fulfilled by procuring supplies produced or services performed incident to programs such as industries of correctional or other governmental institutions. The procurement officer shall determine whether the supplies or services meet the purchasing agency's requirements and whether the price represents a fair market value for the supplies or services. If it is determined that the requirements cannot thus be met or the price is not fair and reasonable, the procurement may be made from the private sector in accordance with the Utah Procurement Code. When procurements are made from other governmental agencies, the private sector need not be solicited to compete against them.

3-120 Purchase of Items Separately from Construction Contract.

The procurement officer is authorized to determine whether a supply item or group of supply items shall be included as a part of, or procured separately from, any contract for construction.

3-121 Exceptions to Competitive Sealed Bid Process.

(1) The Chief Procurement Officer, head of a purchasing agency or designee may utilize alternative procurement methods to purchase items such as the following when determined to be more practicable or advantageous to the state.

(a) Used vehicles

(b) Livestock

(2) Alternative procurement methods including informal price quotations and direct negotiations may be used by the Chief Procurement Officer, head of the purchasing agency or designee for the following:

(a) Hotel conference facilities and services

(b) Speaker honorariums

(3) Subject to the provisions of Section 63F-1-205, testing of new technology for a duration not to exceed the maximum time necessary to evaluate the technology may be permitted. Public notice of the test and testing period shall be conducted under R33-3-4. Unless otherwise approved by the chief procurement officer or head of a purchasing agency, in no event shall a contract entered into under this part or any testing period exceed twelve consecutive months. Upon conclusion of the test period:

(a) a determination has been made by the acquiring agency that the new technology is not advantageous to the acquiring agency; or

(b) an open procurement shall be conducted under these rules.

(4) Documentation of the alternative procurement method utilized shall be part of the contract file.

3-130 Reverse Auctions.

(1) Definition. In accordance with Utah Code Annotated Section 63G-6-402 a "reverse auction" means a process where:

(a) contracts are awarded in a open and interactive environment, which may include the use of electronic media; and

(b) bids are opened and made public immediately, and bidders given opportunity to submit revised, lower bids, until the bidding process is complete.

(2) Reverse auction is a two-phase process consisting of a technical first phase composed of one or more steps in which bidders submit unpriced technical offers to be evaluated against the established criteria by the purchasing agency, and a second phase in which those bidders whose technical offers are determined to be acceptable during the first phase submit their price bids through a reverse auction.

(3) Use. The reverse auction method will be used when the procurement officer deems it to the advantage of the purchasing agency.

3-131 Pre-Bid Conferences in Reverse Auctions.

Prior to the submission of unpriced technical offers, a pre-bid conference as contemplated by section 3-106 may be conducted by the procurement officer. The procurement officer may also hold a conference of all bidders in accordance with section 3-106 at any time during the evaluation of the unpriced technical offers, or to explain the reverse auction process.

3-132 Procedure for Phase One of Reverse Auctions.

(1) Form. A reverse auction shall be initiated by the issuance of an Invitation for Bids in the form required by section 3-101. In addition to the requirements set forth in section 3-101, the reverse auction Invitation for Bids shall state:

(a) that unpriced technical offers are requested;

(b) that it is a reverse auction procurement, and priced bids will be considered only in the second phase and only from those bidders whose unpriced technical offers are found acceptable in the first phase;

(c) the criteria to be used in the evaluation of the unpriced technical offers;

(d) that the purchasing agency, to the extent the procurement officer finds necessary, may conduct oral or written discussions of the unpriced technical offers;

(e) that bidders may designate those portions of the unpriced technical offers which contain trade secrets or other proprietary data which are to remain confidential; and

(f) the manner which the second phase reverse auction will be conducted.

(2) Amendments to the Invitation for Bids. After receipt of unpriced technical offers, amendments to the Invitation for Bids shall be distributed only to bidders who submitted unpriced technical offers and they shall be allowed to submit new unpriced technical offers or to amend those submitted. If, in the opinion of the procurement officer, a contemplated amendment will significantly change the nature of the procurement, the Invitation for Bids shall be canceled in accordance with Subsection R33-3-112(1) of these rules and a new Invitation for Bids issued.

(3) Receipt and Handling of Unpriced Technical Offers. Unpriced technical offers shall be opened publicly identifying only the names of the bidders. Technical offers and modifications shall be time stamped upon receipt and held in a secure place until the established due date. After the date established for receipt of bids, a register of bids shall be open to public inspection and shall include the name of each bidder, and a description sufficient to identify the supply, service, or construction offered. Prior to the selection of the lowest bid of a responsive and responsible bidder following phase two, technical offers shall remain confidential and shall be available only to purchasing agency personnel and those involved in the selection process having a legitimate interest in them.

(4) Non-Disclosure of Proprietary Data. Bidders may request nondisclosure of trade secrets and other proprietary data identified in writing. If a bidder has requested in writing the non-disclosure of trade secrets and other proprietary data so identified, the procurement officer shall examine the request in the proposal to determine its validity prior to the beginning of phase two. If the parties do not agree as to the disclosure of data, the procurement officer shall inform the bidder in writing what portion of the bid will be disclosed and that, unless the bidder withdraws the bid it will be disclosed.

(5) Evaluation of Unpriced Technical Offers. The unpriced technical offers submitted by bidders shall be evaluated solely in accordance with the criteria set forth in the Invitation for Bids. The unpriced technical offers shall be categorized as:

(a) acceptable;

(b) potentially acceptable, that is, reasonably susceptible of being made acceptable; or

(c) unacceptable. The procurement officer shall record in writing the basis for finding an offer unacceptable and make it part of the procurement file.

The procurement officer may initiate phase two of the procedure if, in the procurement officer's opinion, there are sufficient acceptable unpriced technical offers to assure effective price competition in the second phase without modification or alteration of the offers. If the procurement officer finds that this is not the case, the procurement officer shall issue an amendment to the Invitation for Bids or engage in technical discussions as set forth in subsection (6) of this section.

(6) Discussion of Unpriced Technical Offers. Discussion of its technical offer may be conducted by the procurement officer with any bidder who submits an acceptable or potentially acceptable technical offer. During the course of these discussions the procurement officer shall not disclose any information derived from one unpriced technical offer to any other bidder. Once discussions are begun, any bidder who has not been notified that its offer has been finally found unacceptable may submit supplemental information modifying or otherwise amending its technical offer at any time until the closing date established by the procurement officer. This submission may be made at the request of the procurement officer or upon the bidder's own initiative.

(7) Notice of Unacceptable Unpriced Technical Offer. When the procurement officer determines a bidder's unpriced technical offer is unacceptable, the officer shall notify the bidder. After this notification the bidder shall not be afforded an additional opportunity to modify their technical offer.

3-133 Carrying Out Phase Two of Reverse Auctions.

(1) Upon the completion of phase one, the procurement officer shall invite those technically qualified bidders to participate in phase two of the reverse auction which is an open and interactive process where pricing is submitted, made public immediately, and bidders are given opportunity to submit revised, lower bids, until the bidding process is closed.

(2) The invitation for bids shall:

(a) establish a date and time for the beginning of phase two;

(b) establish a closing date and time. The closing date and time need not be a fixed point in time, but may remain dependent on a variable specified in the invitation for bids.

(3) Following receipt of the first bid after the beginning of phase two, the lowest bid price shall be posted, either manually or electronically, and updated as other bidders submit their bids.

(a) At any time before the closing date and time a bidder may submit a lower bid, provided that the price is below the then lowest bid.

(b) Bid prices may not be increased after the beginning of phase two.

3-134 Mistakes During Reverse Auctions.

(1) Mistakes may be corrected or bids may be withdrawn during phase one:

(a) before unpriced technical offers are considered;

(b) after any discussions have commenced under section 3-132(5) (procedure for Phase One of Reverse Auctions, Discussion of Unpriced Technical Offers); or

(c) when responding to any amendment of the Invitation for Bids. Otherwise mistakes may be corrected or withdrawal permitted in accordance with section 3-111.

(2) A phase two bid may be withdrawn only in accordance with 3-111. If a bid is withdrawn, a later bid submitted by the same bidder may not be for a higher price. If the lowest responsive bid is withdrawn after the closing date and time, the procurement officer may cancel the solicitation or reopen phase two bidding to all bidders deemed technically qualified through phase one by giving notice to those bidders of the new date and time for the beginning of phase two and the new closing date and time.

R33-3-2. Competitive Sealed Proposals.

3-201 Use of Competitive Sealed Proposals.

(1) Appropriateness. Competitive sealed proposals may be a more appropriate method for a particular procurement or type of procurement than competitive sealed bidding, after consideration of factors such as:

(a) whether there may be a need for price and service negotiation;

(b) whether there may be a need for negotiation during performance of the contract;

(c) whether the relative skills or expertise of the offerors will have to be evaluated;

(d) whether cost is secondary to the characteristics of the product or service sought, as in a work of art; and

(e) whether the conditions of the service, product or delivery conditions are unable to be sufficiently described in the Invitation for Bids.

(2) Determinations.

(a) Except as provided in Section 63G-6-408 of the Utah Procurement Code, before a solicitation may be issued for competitive sealed proposals, the procurement officer shall determine in writing that competitive sealed proposals is a more appropriate method for contracting than competitive sealed bidding.

(b) The procurement officer may make determinations by category of supply, service, or construction item rather than by individual procurement. Procurement of the types of supplies, services, or construction so designated may then be made by competitive sealed proposals without making the determination competitive sealed bidding is either not practicable or not advantageous. The officer who made the determination may modify or revoke it at any time and the determination should be reviewed for current applicability from time to time.

(3) Professional Services. For procurement of professional services, whenever practicable, the competitive sealed proposal process shall be used. Examples of professional services generally best procured through the RFP process are accounting and auditing, court reporters, x-ray technicians, legal, medical, nursing, education, actuarial, veterinarians, and research. The procurement officer will make the determination. Architecture and engineering professional services are to be procured in compliance with R33-5-510.

3-202 Content of the Request for Proposals.

The Request for Proposals shall be prepared in accordance with section 3-101 provided that it shall also include:

(a) a statement that discussions may be conducted with offerors who submit proposals determined to be reasonably susceptible of being selected for award, but that proposals may be accepted without discussions; and

(b) a statement of when and how price should be submitted.

3-203 Proposal Preparation Time.

Proposal preparation time shall be set to provide offerors a reasonable time to prepare their proposals. A minimum of 10 calendar days shall be provided unless a shorter time is deemed necessary for a particular procurement as determined in writing by the procurement officer.

3-204 Form of Proposal.

The manner in which proposals are to be submitted, including any forms for that purpose, may be designated as a part of the Request for Proposals.

3-204.1 Protected Records.

The following are protected records and will be redacted subject to the procedures described below. From any public disclosure of records as allowed by the Governmental Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA) Title 63G, Chapter 2 of the Utah Code. The protections below apply to the various procurement records including records submitted by offerors and their subcontractors or consultants at any tier.

(a) Trade Secrets. Trade Secrets, as defined in Section 13-24-2, will be protected and not be subject to public disclosure if the procedures of R33-3-204.2 are met.

(b) Certain commercial information or nonindividual financial information. Commercial information or nonindividual financial information subject to the provisions of Section 63G-2-305(2) will be a protected record and not be subject to public disclosure if the procedures of R33-3-204.2 are met.

(c) Other Protected Records under GRAMA. There will be no public disclosure of other submitted records that are subject to non-disclosure or being a protected record under a GRAMA statute provided that the requirements of R33-3-204.2 are met unless GRAMA requires such nondisclosure without any preconditions.

3-204.2 Process For Requesting Non-Disclosure. Any person (firm) who believes that a record should be protected under R33-3-204.1 shall include with their proposal or submitted document:

(a) a written indication of which provisions of the submittal(s) are claimed to be considered for business confidentiality (including trade secret or other reason for non-disclosure under GRAMA; and

(b) a concise statement of reasons supporting each claimed provision of business confidentiality.

3-204.3 Notification. The person who complies with R33-3-204.2 shall be notified by the governmental entity prior to the public release of any information for which business confidentiality has been asserted.

3.204.4 Non-Disclosure and Dispute Process. Except as provided by court order, the governmental entity to whom the request for a record is made under GRAMA, may not disclose a record claimed to be protected under R33-3- 204.1 but which the governmental entity or State Records Committee determines should be disclosed until the period in which to bring an appeal expires or the end of the appeals process, including judicial appeal. This R33-3-204-4 does not apply where the claimant, after notice, has waived the claim by not appealing or intervening before the records committee. To the extent provided by law, the parties to a dispute regarding the release of a record may agree in writing to an alternative dispute resolution process.

3-204.5 Timing of Public Disclosure. Any allowed public disclosure of records submitted in the competitive sealed proposal process will only be made after the selection of the successful offeror(s) has been made public.

3-205 Public Notice.

Public notice shall be given by distributing the Request for Proposals in the same manner provided for distributing an Invitation for Bids under section 3-104.

3-206 Pre-Proposal Conferences.

Pre-proposal conferences may be conducted in accordance with section 3-106. Any conference should be held prior to submission of initial proposals.

3-207 Amendments to Request for Proposals.

Amendments to the Request for Proposals may be made in accordance with section 3-107 prior to submission of proposals. After submission of proposals, amendments to the Request for Proposals shall be distributed only to offerors who submitted proposals and they shall be allowed to submit new proposals or to amend those submitted. An amendment to the Request for Proposals may be issued through a request for submission of Best and Final Offers. If, in the opinion of the procurement officer, a contemplated amendment will significantly change the nature of the procurement, the Request for Proposals shall be canceled and a new Request for Proposals issued.

3-208 Modification or Withdrawal of Proposals.

Proposals may be modified or withdrawn prior to the established due date in accordance with section 3-108. For the purposes of this section and section 3-209, the established due date is either the date and time announced for receipt of proposals or receipt of modifications to proposals, if any; or if discussions have begun, it is the date and time by which best and final offers must be submitted, provided that only offerors who submitted proposals by the time announced for receipt of proposals may submit best and final offers.

3-209 Late Proposals, Late Withdrawals, and Late Modifications.

(1) Definition. Except for modification allowed pursuant to negotiation, any proposal, withdrawal, or modification received after the established due date and time at the place designated for receipt of proposals is late.

(2) Treatment. No late proposal, late modification, or late withdrawal will be considered unless received before contract award, and the late proposal would have been timely but for the action or inaction of personnel directly serving the procurement activity.

(3) Records. All documents shall be kept relating to the acceptance of any late proposal, modification or withdrawal.

3-210 Receipt and Registration of Proposals.

(1) Proposals shall be opened publicly, identifying only the names of the offerors. Proposals submitted through electronic means shall be received in such a manner that the time and date of submittal, along with the contents of such proposals shall be securely stored until the time and date set for opening. Proposals and modifications shall be time stamped upon receipt and held in a secure place until the established due date. After the date established for receipt of proposals, a register of proposals shall be open to public inspection and shall include for all proposals the name of each offeror, the number of modifications received, if any, and a description sufficient to identify the supply, service, or construction item offered. Prior to award proposals and modifications shall be shown only to purchasing agency personnel having a legitimate interest in them.

3-211 Evaluation of Proposals.

(1) Evaluation Factors in the Request for Proposals. The Request for Proposals shall state all of the evaluation factors and their relative importance, including price.

(2) Evaluation. The evaluation shall be based on the evaluation factors set forth in the Request for Proposals. Numerical rating systems may be used but are not required. Factors not specified in the Request for Proposals shall not be considered in determining award of contract.

(3) Classifying Proposals. For the purpose of conducting discussions under section 3-212, proposals shall be initially classified as:

(a) acceptable;

(b) potentially acceptable, that is, reasonably susceptible of being made acceptable; or

(c) unacceptable.

3-212 Proposal Discussion with Individual Offerors.

(1) "Offerors" Defined. For the purposes of this section, the term "offerors" includes only those businesses submitting proposals that are acceptable or potentially acceptable. The term shall not include businesses which submitted unacceptable proposals.

(2) Purposes of Discussions. Discussions are held to facilitate and encourage an adequate number of potential contractors to offer their best proposals, by amending their original offers, if needed.

(3) Conduct of Discussions. Offerors shall be accorded fair and equal treatment with respect to any opportunity for discussions and revisions of proposals. The procurement officer should establish procedures and schedules for conducting discussions. If before, or during discussions there is a need for clarification or change of the Request for Proposals, it shall be amended in compliance with R33-3-2(3-207) to incorporate this clarification or change. Auction techniques and disclosure of any information derived from competing proposals are prohibited. Any oral clarification or change of a proposal shall be reduced to writing by the offeror.

(4) Best and Final Offers. The procurement officer shall establish a common time and date for submission of best and final offers. Best and final offers shall be submitted only once unless the procurement officer makes a written determination before each subsequent round of best and final offers demonstrating another round is in the purchasing agency's interest, and additional discussions will be conducted or the purchasing agency's requirements will be changed. Otherwise, no discussion of, or changes in, the best and final offers shall be allowed prior to award. Offerors shall also be informed that if they do not submit a notice of withdrawal or another best and final offer, their immediate previous offer will be construed as their best and final offer.

3-213 Mistakes in Proposals.

(1) Mistakes Discovered Before the Established Due Date. An offeror may correct mistakes discovered before the time and date established for receipt of proposals by withdrawing or correcting the proposal as provided in section 3-208.

(2) Confirmation of Proposal. When it appears from a review of the proposal before award that a mistake has been made, the offeror should be asked to confirm the proposal. If the offeror alleges mistake, the proposal may be corrected or withdrawn during any discussions that are held or if the conditions set forth in subsection (3) of this section are met.

(3) Mistakes Discovered After Receipt But Before Award. This subsection sets forth procedures to be applied in four situations in which mistakes in proposals are discovered after receipt of proposals but before award.

(a) During Discussions; Prior to Best and Final Offers. Once discussions are commenced with any offeror or after best and final offers are requested, any offeror may freely correct any mistake by modifying or withdrawing the proposal until the time and date set for receipt of best and final offers.

(b) Minor Informalities. Minor informalities, unless otherwise corrected by an offeror as provided in this section, shall be treated as they are under competitive sealed bidding.

(c) Correction of Mistakes. If discussions are not held or if the best and final offers upon which award will be made have been received, mistakes may be corrected and the correct offer considered only if:

(i) the mistake and the correct offer are clearly evident on the face of the proposal in which event the proposal may not be withdrawn; or

(ii) the mistake is not clearly evident on the face of the proposal, but the offeror submits proof of evidentiary value which clearly and convincingly demonstrates both the existence of a mistake and the correct offer and the correction would not be contrary to the fair and equal treatment of other offerors.

(d) Withdrawal of Proposals. If discussions are not held, or if the best and final offers upon which award will be made have been received, the offeror may be permitted to withdraw the proposal if:

(i) the mistake is clearly evident on the face of the proposal and the correct offer is not; or

(ii) the offeror submits proof of evidentiary value which clearly and convincingly demonstrates that a mistake was made but does not demonstrate the correct offer or, if the correct offer is also demonstrated, to allow correction on the basis that the proof would be contrary to the fair and equal treatment of other offerors.

(4) Mistakes Discovered After Award. Mistakes shall not be corrected after award of the contract.

3-214 Award.

(1) Award Documentation. A brief written justification statement shall be made showing the basis on which the award was found to be most advantageous to the state taking into consideration price and the other evaluation factors set forth in the Request for Proposals.

(2) One Proposal Received. If only one proposal is received in response to a Request for Proposals, the procurement officer may, as the officer deems appropriate, either make an award or, if time permits, resolicit for the purpose of obtaining additional competitive sealed proposals.

3-215 Publicizing Awards.

(1) After the selection of the successful offeror(s), notice of award shall be available in the purchasing agency's office and may be available on the internet.

(2) The following shall be disclosed to the public after notice of the selection of the successful offeror(s) and after receipt of a GRAMA request and payment of any lawfully enacted and applicable fees:

(a) the contract(s) entered into as a result of the selection and the successful proposal(s), except for those portions that are to be non-disclosed under R33-3-204;

(b) the unsuccessful proposals, except for those portions that are to be non-disclosed under R33-3- 204;

(c) the rankings of the proposals;

(d) the names of the members of any selection committee (reviewing authority);

(e) the final scores used by the selection committee to make the selection, except that the names of the individual scorers shall not be associated with their individual scores or rankings.

(f) the written justification statement supporting the selection, except for those portions that are to be non-disclosed under R33-3-204.

(3) After due consideration and public input, the following has been determined by the Procurement Policy Board to impair governmental procurement proceedings or give an unfair advantage to any person proposing to enter into a contract or agreement with a governmental entity, and will not be disclosed by the governmental entity at any time to the public including under any GRAMA request:

(a) the names of individual scorers in relation to their individual scores or rankings;

(b) non-public financial statements; and

(c) past performance and reference information, which is not provided by the offeror and which is obtained as a result of the efforts of the governmental entity. To the extent such past performance or reference information is included in the written justification statement, it is subject to public disclosure.

3-216 Exceptions to Competitive Sealed Proposal Process.

(1) As authorized by Section 63G-6-408(1) the Chief Procurement Officer or designee may determine that for a given request it is either not practicable or not advantageous for the state to procure a commodity or service referenced in section 3-201 above by soliciting competitive sealed proposals. When making this determination, the Chief Procurement Officer may take into consideration whether the potential cost of preparing, soliciting and evaluating competitive sealed proposals is expected to exceed the benefits normally associated with such solicitations. In the event that it is so determined, the Chief Procurement Officer, head of a purchasing agency or designee may elect to utilize an alternative, more cost effective procurement method, which may include direct negotiations with a qualified vendor or contractor.

(2) Subject to the provisions of Section 63F-1-205, testing of new technology for a duration not to exceed the maximum time necessary to evaluate the technology may be permitted. Public notice of the test and testing period shall be conducted under R33-3-4. Unless otherwise approved by the chief procurement officer or head of a purchasing agency, in no event shall a contract entered into under this part or any testing period exceed twelve consecutive months. Upon conclusion of the test period:

(a) a determination has been made by the acquiring agency that the technology is not advantageous to the acquiring agency; or

(b) an open procurement shall be conducted under these rules.

(3) Documentation of the alternative procurement method selected shall state the reasons for selection and shall be made a part of the contract file.

3-217 Multiple Award Contracts for Human Service Provider Services.

The Chief Procurement Officer, head of a purchasing agency or designee may elect to award multiple contracts for Human Service Provider Services through a competitive sealed proposal process by first determining the appropriate fee to be paid to providers and then contracting with all providers meeting the criteria established in the RFP. However this specialized system of contracting for human service provider services may only be used when:

(1) The agency has performed an appropriate analysis to determine appropriate rates to be paid;

(2) The agency files contain adequate documentation of the reasons the contractor was awarded the contract and the reasons for selecting a particular contractor to provide the service to each client; and

(3) The agency has a formal written complaint and appeal process, notice of which is provided to the contractors, and an internal audit function to insure that selection of the contractor from the list of awarded contractors was fair, equitable and appropriate.

R33-3-3. Small Purchases.

3-301 General Provisions.

(1) All small purchases must comply with this rule unless another method of source selection provided in Title 63G-6a, the Utah Procurement Code and Administrative Rule R33 is used.

(a) Sole source procurements must follow the process outlined in the Utah Procurement Code and Administrative Rule R33-3-4.

(2) Use of State Cooperative Contracts. An executive branch procurement unit may not obtain a procurement item through this Small Purchasing Rule if the procurement item may be obtained through a state cooperative contract or a contract awarded by the chief procurement officer under Utah Code 63G-6a-2105(1) unless either (a) or (b) below is met:

(a) The procurement item is obtained for an urgent or unanticipated, emergency condition, including:

(i) an item needed to avoid stopping a public construction project;

(ii) an immediate repair to a facility or equipment; or

(iii) another emergency condition.

(b) The chief procurement officer or the head of a procurement unit that is an executive branch procurement unit with independent procurement authority determines in writing:

(i) that it is in the best interest of the state to obtain a procurement item outside of the state contract after reviewing a cost/benefit analysis comparing, as applicable, the following:

(A) the contract terms and conditions applicable to the procurement item under the state contract with the contract terms and conditions applicable to the procurement item if the procurement item is obtained outside of the state contract;

(B) the maintenance and service applicable to the procurement item under the state contract with the maintenance and service applicable to the procurement item if the procurement item is obtained outside of the state contract;

(C) the warranties applicable to the procurement item under the state contract with the warranties applicable to the procurement item if the procurement item is obtained outside of the state contract;

(D) the quality of the procurement item under the state contract with the quality of the procurement item if the procurement item is obtained outside of the state contract;

(E) the cost of the procurement item under the state contract with the cost of the procurement item if the procurement item is obtained outside of the state contract; and

(i) that for a procurement item which if defective in its manufacture, installation, or performance, may result in serious physical injury, death, or substantial property damage; the terms and conditions including insurance, indemnifications and warranties, relating to liability for injury, death, or property damage, available from the source other than the contractor who holds the state contract, are similar to, or better than, the terms and conditions available under the state contract.

(3) Prohibition Against Artificial Division of Procurements and Invoices. The Utah Procurement Code provides the following prohibitions: It is unlawful for a person to intentionally or knowingly divide a procurement into one or more smaller procurements with the intent to make a procurement:

(a) qualify as a small purchase if, before dividing the procurement, it would not have qualified as a small purchase; or

(b) meet a threshold established by rule made by the applicable rulemaking authority if, before dividing the procurement, it would not have met the threshold.

(4) A division of a procurement that is prohibited includes doing any of the following with the intent or knowledge described in (3)(a) or (3)(b):

(a) making two or more separate purchases;

(b) dividing an invoice or purchase order into two or more invoices or purchase orders; or

(c) making smaller purchases over a period of time.

(5) A procurement unit subject to these rules may implement more, but not less, restrictive thresholds or require threshold limits to be consolidated at the highest administrative level within the organization.

3-302 Small Purchase Thresholds for Individual Procurement Item(s) under $1,000.

(1) Thresholds for Individual Procurement Item(s) under $1,000:

(a) "Individual Procurement Threshold" means the maximum amount for which a procurement unit subject to these rules may purchase an individual procurement item under this Rule R33-3-302.

(b) "Single Procurement Aggregate Threshold" means the maximum total amount that a procurement unit subject to these rules may expend to obtain multiple individual procurement items from one source at one time under this Rule R33-3-302.

(c) "Annual Cumulative Threshold" means the maximum total amount that a procurement unit subject to these rules may expend to obtain individual procurement items from the same source under this Rule R33-3-302.

(i) For the purpose of this rule, "annual" is defined as the applicable fiscal year of each entity subject to these rules.

(d) The individual procurement threshold $1,000 for a procurement item;

(e) The single procurement aggregate threshold is $5,000 for multiple procurement item(s)purchased from one source at one time; and

(f) The annual cumulative threshold from the same source is $50,000.

(2) For individual procurement item(s) costing up to $1,000, an entity subject to these rules may select the best source by direct award and without seeking competitive bids or quotes.

(3) Competition. Whenever practicable, the Division of Purchasing and General Services and entities subject to these rules shall use a rotation system or other system designed to allow for competition when using the small purchases process.

(4) A procurement unit may not use the small purchase process described in this rule for ongoing, continuous, and regularly scheduled individual procurement items that exceed the annual cumulative threshold and shall make its ongoing, continuous, and regularly scheduled procurements for individual procurement items that exceed the annual cumulative threshold through a contract awarded in accordance with the Utah Procurement Code.

(5) Small purchase expenditures may not exceed the thresholds established under this rule unless the chief procurement officer or the head of a procurement unit with independent procurement authority provides written justification for exceeding a threshold.

3-303 Professional Services, Including Architectural and Engineering Services Threshold.

(1) "Professional Services, Including Architectural and Engineering" means the total cost to be paid to a professional services provider in conjunction with a small project or purchase under this Rule R33-3-3.

(a) The small purchase threshold for professional services, including architectural and engineering services, is $100,000;

(b) Procurement units subject to these rules shall follow the process outlined in Utah Procurement Code 63G-6a-403 (Prequalification of Potential Vendors) and 63G-6a-404 (Approved Vendor List) or other applicable selection methods outlined in the Utah Procurement Code for the procurement of professional services that include minimum specifications. Executive Branch procurement units, to the extent they do not have independent procurement authority, shall involve the Division of Purchasing and General Services in the procurement of professional services;

(c) A contract may not be awarded through a sole source, except as provided in the Utah Procurement Code or Administrative Rule R33-3-4.

3-304 Small Construction Project Threshold.

(1) "Small Construction Project" means the total amount of the construction project including programming, design, and all associated construction costs for a purchase under this Rule33-3-3.

(a) The small construction project threshold is $2,500,000;

(b) Procurement units subject to these rules shall follow the process outlined in the Utah Procurement Code 63G-6a-403 (Prequalification of Potential Vendors) and 63G-6a-404 (Approved Vendor List) or other applicable selection methods outlined in the Utah Procurement Code for construction services.

(c) Executive Branch procurement units, to the extent they do not have independent procurement authority, shall involve the Division of Purchasing and General Services in the procurement of all construction services.

(d) The Division of Purchasing and General Services may procure small construction projects costing less than $25,001 by direct award without seeking competitive bids or quotes after documenting that all building code approvals, licensing requirements, permitting and other construction related requirements are met. The awarded contractor must certify that they are capable of meeting the minimum specifications of the project.

(e) Procurement units, with independent procurement authority and subject to these rules, may procure small construction projects costing less than $25,001 by direct award without seeking competitive bids or quotes after documenting that all applicable building code approvals, licensing requirements, permitting and other construction related requirements are met. The awarded contractor must certify that they are capable of meeting the minimum specifications of the project.

(f) The Division of Purchasing and General Services may procure small construction projects costing between $25,001 and $100,000 by obtaining a minimum of two competitive quotes that include minimum specifications and shall award to the contractor with the lowest quote that meets the specification after documenting that all applicable building code approvals, licensing requirements, permitting and other construction related requirements are met.

(g) Procurement units, with independent procurement authority and subject to these rules, may procure small construction projects costing between $25,001 and $100,000 by obtaining a minimum of two competitive quotes that include minimum specifications and shall award to the contractor with the lowest quote that meets the specification after documenting that all applicable building code approvals, licensing requirements, permitting and other construction related requirements are met.

(h) Procurement units with independent procurement authority and subject to these rules, shall procure small construction projects over $100,000 using an invitation to bid or other approve source selection method outlined in the Utah Procurement Code that include minimum specifications and shall award to the contractor meeting the specifications after documenting that all applicable building code approvals, licensing requirements, permitting and other construction related requirements are met.

(i) A contract may not be awarded through a sole source, except as provided in the Utah Procurement Code or Administrative Rule R33-3-4.

3-305 Small Purchases from $1,001 to $50,000 Requiring Quotes.

(1) Procedures.

(a) For procurement item(s) costing between $1,001 and $5,000, an entity subject to these rules shall obtain a minimum of two competitive quotes that include minimum specifications and shall purchase the procurement item from the responsible vendor offering the lowest quote that meets the specifications.

(b) For procurement item(s) costing between $5,001 and $50,000, a procurement unit with independent procurement authority that is subject to these rules or the Division of Purchasing and General Services on behalf of an executive branch procurement unit without independent procurement authority, as applicable, shall obtain a minimum of two competitive quotes that include minimum specifications and shall purchase the procurement item from the responsible vendor offering the lowest quote that meets the specification.

(c) For procurement item(s) costing over $50,000, a procurement unit with independent procurement authority that is subject to these rules or the Division of Purchasing and General Services on behalf of an executive branch procurement unit without independent procurement authority, as applicable, shall conduct an invitation for bids or other procurement process outlined in the Utah Procurement Code.

(2) Limited Purchasing Delegation for Small Purchases. The Division of Purchasing and General Services may delegate limited purchasing authority for small purchases costing between $5,001 and $50,000, provided that the executive branch procurement unit enters into an agreement with the Division outlining the duties and responsibilities of the unit to comply with applicable laws, rules, policies and other requirements of the Division.

(3) Records. The names of the vendors offering quotations and bids and the date and amount of each quotation or bid shall be recorded and maintained as a governmental record.

3-306 Small Purchases of Services of Professionals, Providers, and Consultants.

If it is expected that the services of professionals, providers, and consultants can be procured for less than $50,000, the procedures specified in this subpart may be used.

R33-3-4. Sole Source Procurement.

3-401 Conditions For Use of Sole Source Procurement.

Sole source procurement shall be used only if a requirement is reasonably available from a single supplier. A requirement for a particular proprietary item does not justify a sole source procurement if there is more than one potential bidder or offeror for that item.

Examples of circumstances which could necessitate sole source procurement are:

(1) where the compatibility of equipment, accessories, replacement parts, or service is the paramount consideration;

(2) where a sole supplier's item is needed for trial use or testing;

(3) a test or pilot is being conducted under R33-3-121(3);

(4) procurement of items for resale;

(5) procurement of public utility services.

The determination as to whether a procurement shall be made as a sole source shall be made by the procurement officer. Each request shall be submitted in writing by the using agency. The officer may specify the application of the determination and its duration. In cases of reasonable doubt, competition should be solicited. Any request by a using agency that a procurement be restricted to one potential contractor shall be accompanied by an explanation as to why no other will be suitable or acceptable to meet the need.

3-401.5 Notice of Proposed Sole Source Procurement.

Public notice for sole source procurements exceeding $50,000 shall be given by the Procurement Officer as provided in R33-3-104 (2). The notice shall be published at least 5 working days in advance of when responses must be received in order that firms have an adequate opportunity to respond to the notice. The notice shall contain a brief statement of the proposed procurement, the proposed sole source supplier and the sole source justification. The notice shall invite comments regarding the proposed sole source and provide for a closing date for comments. The Procurement Officer shall consider the comments received before proceeding with the Sole Source procurement.

3-402 Negotiation in Sole Source Procurement.

The procurement officer shall conduct negotiations, as appropriate, as to price, delivery, and terms.

3-403 Unsolicited Offers.

(1) Definition. An unsolicited offer is any offer other than one submitted in response to a solicitation.

(2) Processing of Unsolicited Offers. If a purchasing agency that receives an unsolicited offer is not authorized to enter into a contract for the supplies or services offered, the head of the agency shall forward the offer to the procurement officer who has authority with respect to evaluation, acceptance, and rejection of the unsolicited offers.

(3) Conditions for Consideration. To be considered for evaluation an unsolicited offer:

(a) must be sufficiently detailed to allow a judgment to be made concerning the potential utility of the offer to the purchasing agency; and

(b) may be subject to testing under terms and conditions specified by the agency.

R33-3-5. Emergency Procurements.

3-501 Definition of Emergency Conditions.

An emergency condition is a situation which creates a threat to public health, welfare, or safety as may arise by reason of floods, epidemics, riots, equipment failures, or other reason as may be determined by the Chief Procurement Officer or designee. The existence of this condition creates an immediate and serious need for supplies, services, or construction that cannot be met through normal procurement methods.

3-502 Scope of Emergency Procurements.

Emergency procurement shall be limited to only those supplies, services, or construction items necessary to meet the emergency.

3-503 Authority to Make Emergency Procurements.

The Chief Procurement Officer may delegate in writing to any purchasing agency authority to make emergency procurements of up to an amount set forth in the delegation.

3-504 Source Selection Methods.

(1) General. The source selection method used shall be selected with a view to the end of assuring that the required supplies, services, or construction items are procured in time to meet the emergency. Given this constraint, competition that is practicable shall be obtained.

(2) After Unsuccessful Competitive Sealed Bidding. Competitive sealed bidding is unsuccessful when bids received pursuant to an Invitation for Bids are unreasonable, noncompetitive, or the low bid exceeds available funds as certified by the appropriate fiscal officer, and time or other circumstances will not permit the delay required to resolicit competitive sealed bids. If emergency conditions exist after or are brought about by an unsuccessful attempt to use competitive sealed bidding, an emergency procurement may be made.

3-505 Determination of Emergency Procurement.

The procurement officer or the agency official responsible for procurement shall make a written determination stating the basis for an emergency procurement and for the selection of the particular supplier. The determination shall be sent promptly to the Chief Procurement Officer.

R33-3-6. Responsibility.

3-601 Standards of Responsibility.

(1) Standards. Among factors to be considered in determining whether the standard of responsibility has been met are whether a prospective contractor has:

(a) available the appropriate financial, material, equipment, facility, and personnel resources and expertise, or the ability to obtain them, necessary to indicate capability to meet all contractual requirements;

(b) a satisfactory record of integrity;

(c) qualified legally to contract with the purchasing agency; and

(d) unreasonably failed to supply any necessary information in connection with the inquiry concerning responsibility.

Nothing shall prevent the procurement officer from establishing additional responsibility standards for a particular procurement, provided that these additional standards are set forth in the solicitation.

(2) Information Pertaining To Responsibility. A prospective contractor shall supply information requested by the procurement officer concerning the responsibility of the contractor. If the contractor fails to supply the requested information, the procurement officer shall base the determination of responsibility upon any available information or may find the prospective contractor nonresponsible if the failure is unreasonable.

3-602 Ability to Meet Standards.

The prospective contractor may demonstrate the availability of necessary financing, equipment, facilities, expertise, and personnel by submitting upon request:

(1) evidence that the contractor possesses the necessary items;

(2) acceptable plans to subcontract for the necessary items; or

(3) a documented commitment from, or explicit arrangement with, a satisfactory source to provide the necessary items.

3-603 Written Determination of Nonresponsibility Required.

If a bidder or offeror who otherwise would have been awarded a contract is found nonresponsible, a written determination of nonresponsibility setting forth the basis of the finding shall be prepared by the procurement officer. The determination shall be made part of the procurement file.

R33-3-7. Types of Contracts.

3-701 Policy Regarding Selection of Contract Types.

(1) General. The selection of an appropriate contract type depends on factors such as the nature of the supplies, services, or construction to be procured, the uncertainties which may be involved in contract performance, and the extent to which the purchasing agency or the contractor is to assume the risk of the cost of performance of the contract. Contract types differ in the degree of responsibility assumed by the contractor for the costs of performance and the amount and kind of profit incentive offered the contractor to achieve or exceed specified standards or goals.

Among the factors to be considered in selecting any type of contract are:

(a) the type and complexity of the supply, service, or construction item being procured;

(b) the difficulty of estimating performance costs such as the inability of the purchasing agency to develop definitive specifications, to identify the risks to the contractor inherent in the nature of the work to be performed, or otherwise to establish clearly the requirements of the contract;

(c) the administrative costs to both parties;

(d) the degree to which the purchasing agency must provide technical coordination during the performance of the contract;

(e) the effect of the choice of the type of contract on the amount of competition to be expected;

(f) the stability of material or commodity market prices or wage levels;

(g) the urgency of the requirement;

(h) the length of contract performance; and

(i) federal requirements.

The purchasing agency should not contract in a manner that would place an unreasonable economic risk on the contractor, since this action would tend to jeopardize satisfactory performance on the contract.

(2) Use of Unlisted Contract Types. The provisions of this subpart list and define the principal contract types. In addition, any other type of contract, except cost-plus-a-percentage-of-cost, may be used provided the procurement officer determines in writing that this use is in the purchasing agency's best interest.

(3) Prepayments.

(a) In general, it is the policy of the state that payments to contractors and vendors cannot be made until after services are actually rendered or goods are actually received. It may be necessary or beneficial to the state in certain instances to pay for goods or services before delivery.

(b) Prepayments are allowable in any of the following circumstances when approved by the Chief Procurement Officer or Head of a Purchasing Agency, or any of their authorized designees, and the using agency has policies and procedures that ensure that prepaid goods or services are actually received in the condition as required by the contract or purchase order:

(i) When it is the customary practice for the type of goods or services involved, including insurance, rent, certain maintenance contracts, seminars, or subscriptions.

(ii) When the using agency will receive additional benefit for prepayment, including price breaks on prepaid maintenance contracts, or registrations which would not be available if the charge was paid after delivery, and other benefits which are identifiable.

(c) All prepaid expenditures must be supported by documentation, which states the goods or services to be furnished, the date of delivery, the payment terms, and remedies for non-compliance.

(d) The Chief Procurement Officer or Head of a Purchasing Agency, or any of their authorized designees, may:

(i) Authorize the use of prepayments upon receipt of a written request from the using agency. The request must acknowledge that the using agency understands the liability and risk associated with the failure of a vendor or contractor to perform the prepaid services or provide the prepaid goods.

(ii) Require a performance bond in an amount up to 100% of the prepayment amount. The performance bond must be delivered to the state prior to the time the contract is executed or a purchase order is issued. Performance bonds must be from sureties meeting the requirements of Subsection R33-5-341(b) and be on forms acceptable to the state. If a contractor or vendor fails to deliver a required performance bond, the original award may be cancelled and the award may thereafter be made in accordance with the applicable provision of Rule R33-3.

3-702 Fixed-Price Contracts.

(1) General. A fixed-price contract is the preferred and generally utilized type of contract. A fixed-price contract places responsibility on the contractor for the delivery of the product or the complete performance of the services or construction in accordance with the contract terms at a price that may be firm or subject to contractually specified adjustments. The fixed-price contract is appropriate for use when there is a reasonably definitive requirement, as in the case of construction or standard commercial products. The use of a fixed-price contract when risks are unknown or not readily measurable in terms of cost can result in inflated prices and inadequate competition; poor performance, disputes, and claims when performance proves difficult; or excessive profits when anticipated contingencies do not occur.

(2) Firm Fixed-Price Contract. A firm fixed-price contract provides a price that is not subject to adjustment.

(3) Fixed-Price Contract with Price Adjustment.

(a) A fixed-price contract with price adjustment provides for variation in the contract price under special conditions defined in the contract, other than customary provisions authorizing price adjustments due to modifications to the work. The formula or other basis by which the adjustment in contract price can be made shall be specified in the solicitation and the resulting contract. However, clauses providing for most-favored-customer prices for the purchasing agency, that is, the price to the purchasing agency will be lowered to the lowest priced sales to any other customer made during the contract period, shall not be used. Examples of conditions under which adjustments may be provided in fixed-price contracts are:

(i) changes in the contractor's labor contract rates;

(ii) changes due to rapid and substantial price fluctuations, which can be related to an accepted index; and

(iii) when a general price change alters the base price.

(b) If the contract permits unilateral action by the contractor to bring about the condition under which a price increase may occur, the contract shall reserve to the purchasing agency the right to reject the price increase and terminate the contract without cost or damages. Notice of the price increase shall be given by the contractor in the manner and within the time specified in the contract.

3-703 Cost-Reimbursement Contracts.

(1) General. The cost-reimbursement contract provides for payment to the contractor of allowable costs incurred in the performance of the contract as determined in accordance with part 7 of these rules and provided in the contract. This type of contract establishes at the outset an estimated cost for the performance of the contract and a dollar ceiling which the contractor may not exceed without prior approval of subsequent ratification by the procurement officer and, in addition, may provide for payment of a fee. The contractor agrees to perform as specified in the contract until the contract is completed or until the costs reach the specified ceiling, whichever occurs first.

This contract type is appropriate when the uncertainties involved in contract performance are of a magnitude that the cost of contract performance cannot be estimated with sufficient reasonableness to permit use of any type of fixed-price contract. In addition, a cost-reimbursement contract necessitates appropriate monitoring by purchasing agency personnel during performance so as to give reasonable assurance that the objectives of the contract are being met. It is particularly suitable for research, development, and study-type contracts.

(2) Determination Prior to Use. A cost-reimbursement contract may be used only when the procurement officer determines in writing that:

(a) a contract is likely to be less costly to the purchasing agency than any other type or that it is impracticable to obtain otherwise, the supplies, services, or construction;

(b) the proposed contractor's accounting system will permit timely development of all necessary cost data in the form required by the specific contract type contemplated; and

(c) the proposed contractor's accounting system is adequate to allocate costs in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

(3) Cost Contract. A cost contract provides that the contractor will be reimbursed for allowable costs incurred in performing the contract.

(4) Cost-Plus-Fixed-Fee Contract. This is a cost-reimbursement type contract which provides for payment to the contractor of an agreed fixed fee in addition to reimbursement of allowable, incurred costs. The fee is established at the time of contract award and does not vary whether the actual cost of contract performance is greater or less than the initial estimated cost established for the work. Thus, the fee is fixed but not the contract amount because the final contract amount will depend on the allowable costs reimbursed. The fee is subject to adjustment only if the contract is modified to provide for an increase or decrease in the work specified in the contract.

3-704 Cost Incentive Contracts.

(1) General. Cost incentive contracts provide for the sharing of cost risks between the purchasing agency and the contractor. This type of contract provides for the reimbursement to the contractor of allowable costs incurred up to a ceiling amount and establishes a formula in which the contractor is rewarded for performing at less than target cost or is penalized if it exceeds target cost. Profit or fee is dependent on how effectively the contractor controls cost in the performance of the contract.

(2) Fixed-Price Cost Incentive Contract.

(a) Description. In a fixed-price cost incentive contract, the parties establish at the outset a target cost, a target profit, a cost-sharing formula which provides a percentage increase or decrease of the target profit depending on whether the cost of performance is less than or exceeds the target cost, and a ceiling price. After performance of the contract, the actual cost of performance is arrived at based on the total incurred allowable cost as determined in accordance with part 7 of these rules and as provided in the contract. The final contract price is then established in accordance with the cost-sharing formula using the actual cost of performance. The final contract price may not exceed the ceiling price. The contractor is obligated to complete performance of the contract, and, if actual cost exceeds the ceiling price, the contractor suffers a loss.

(b) Objective. The fixed-price cost incentive contract serves three objectives. It permits the establishment of a firm ceiling price for performance of the contract which takes into account uncertainties and contingencies in the cost of performance. It motivates the contractor to perform the contract economically since cost is in inverse relation to profit; the lower the cost, the higher the profit. It provides a flexible pricing mechanism for establishing a cost sharing responsibility between the purchasing agency and contractor depending on the nature of the supplies, services, or construction being procured, the length of the contract performance, and the performance risks involved.

(3) Cost-Plus Contract with Cost Incentive Fee. In a cost-plus contract with cost incentive fee, the parties establish at the outset a target cost; a target fee; a cost-sharing formula for increase or decrease of fee depending on whether actual cost of performance is less than or exceeds the target cost, with maximum and minimum fee limitations; and a cost ceiling which represents the maximum amount which the purchasing agency is obligated to reimburse the contractor. The contractor continues performance until the work is complete or costs reach the ceiling specified in the contract, whichever first occurs. After performance is complete or costs reach the ceiling, the total incurred, allowable costs reimbursed in accordance with part 7 of these rules and as provided in the contract are applied in the cost- sharing formula to establish the incentive fee payable to the contractor. This type contract gives the contractor a stronger incentive to efficiently manage the contract than a cost-plus-fixed-fee contract provides.

(4) Determinations Required. Prior to entering into any cost incentive contract, the procurement officer shall make the written determination required by subsections 3-703(2)(b) and (c) of these rules. In addition, prior to entering any cost-plus contract with cost incentive fee, the procurement officer shall include in the written determination the determination required by subsection 3-703(2)(a) of these rules.

3-705 Performance Incentive Contracts.

In a performance incentive contract, the parties establish at the outset a pricing basis for the contract, performance goals, and a formula for increasing or decreasing the compensation if the specified performance goals are exceeded or not met. For example, early completion may entitle the contractor to a bonus while late completion may entitle the purchasing agency to a price decrease.

3-706 Time and Materials Contracts; Labor Hour Contracts.

(1) Time and Materials Contracts. Time and materials contracts provide for payment for materials at cost and labor performed at an hourly rate which includes overhead and profit. These contracts provide no incentives to minimize costs or effectively manage the contract work. Consequently, all such contracts shall contain a stated cost ceiling and shall be entered into only after the procurement officer determines in writing that:

(a) personnel have been assigned to closely monitor the performance of the work; and

(b) no other type of contract will suitably serve the purchasing agency's purpose.

(2) Labor Hour Contracts. A labor hour contract is the same as a time and materials contract except the contractor supplies no material. It is subject to the same considerations, and the procurement officer shall make the same determinations before it is used.

3-707 Definite Quantity and Indefinite Quantity Contracts.

(1) Definite Quantity. A definite quantity contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for delivery of a specified quantity of supplies or services either at specified times or when ordered.

(2) Indefinite Quantity. An indefinite quantity contract is a contract for an indefinite amount of supplies or services to be furnished as ordered that establishes unit prices of a fixed-price type. Generally an approximate quantity or the best information available is stated in the solicitation. The contract may provide a minimum quantity the purchasing agency is obligated to order and may also provide for a maximum quantity provision that limits the purchasing agency's obligation to order. The time of performance of an indefinite quantity contract may be extended upon agreement of the parties provided the extension is for 90 days or less and the procurement officer determines in writing that it is not practical to award another contract at the time of the extension.

(3) Requirements Contracts. A requirements contract is an indefinite quantity contract for supplies or services that obligates the purchasing agency to order all the actual, normal requirements of designated using agencies during a specified period of time; and for the protection of the purchasing agency and the contractor. Invitations for Bids and resulting requirements contracts shall include a provision. However, the purchasing agency may reserve in the solicitation and in the resulting contract the right to take bids separately if a particular quantity requirement arises which exceeds an amount specified in the contract. Requirements contracts shall contain an exemption from ordering under the contract when the procurement officer approves a finding that the supply or service available under the contract will not meet a nonrecurring, special need of the purchasing agency.

3-708 Progressive and Multiple Awards.

(1) Progressive Award. A progressive award is an award of portions of a definite quantity requirement to more than one contractor. Each portion is for a definite quantity and the sum of the portions is the total definite quantity procured. A progressive award may be in the purchasing agency's best interest when awards to more than one bidder or offeror for different amounts of the same item are needed to obtain the total quantity or the time or times of delivery required.

(2) Multiple Award. A multiple award is an award of an indefinite quantity contract for one or more similar supplies or services to more than one bidder or offeror, and the purchasing agency is obligated to order all of its actual, normal requirements for the specified supplies or services from those contractors. A multiple award may be in the purchasing agency's best interest when award to two or more bidders or offerors for similar products is needed for adequate delivery, service, or availability, or for product compatibility. In making a multiple award, care shall be exercised to protect and promote the principles of competitive solicitation. All eligible users of the contract shall be named in the solicitation, and it shall be mandatory that the requirements of the users that can be met under the contract be obtained in accordance with the contract, provided, that:

(a) the purchasing agency shall reserve the right to take bids separately if a particular quantity requirement arises which exceeds an amount specified in the contract; or

(b) the purchasing agency shall reserve the right to take bids separately if the procurement officer approves a finding that the supply or service available under the contract will not meet a nonrecurring special need of the agency.

(3) Intent to Use. If a progressive or multiple award is anticipated prior to issuing a solicitation, the method of award shall be stated in the solicitation.

3-709 Leases.

(1) Use. A lease may be entered into provided:

(a) it is in the best interest of the purchasing agency;

(b) all conditions for renewal and costs of termination are set forth in the lease; and

(c) the lease is not used to avoid a competitive procurement.

(2) Competition. Lease and lease-purchase contracts are subject to the requirements of competition which govern the procurement of supplies.

(3) Lease with Purchase Option. A purchase option in a lease may be exercised only if the lease containing the purchase option was awarded under competitive bidding or competitive proposals, unless the requirement can be met only by the supply or facility being leased as determined in writing by the procurement officer. Before exercising this option, the procurement officer shall:

(a) investigate alternative means of procuring comparable supplies or facilities; and

(b) compare estimated costs and benefits associated with the alternative means and the exercise of the option, for example, the benefit of buying new state of the art data processing equipment compared to the estimated, initial savings associated with exercise of a purchase option.

3-710 Multi-Year Contracts; Installment Payments.

(1) Use. A contract may be entered into which extends beyond the current fiscal period provided any obligation for payment in a succeeding fiscal period is subject to the availability of funds.

(2) Termination. A multi-year contract may be terminated without cost to the purchasing agency by reason of unavailability of funds for the purpose or for lack of performance by the contractor. Termination for other reason shall be as provided by the contract.

(3) Installment Payments. Supply contracts may provide for installment purchase payments, including interest charges, over a period of time. Installment payments, however, should be used judiciously in order to achieve economy and not to avoid budgetary restraints, and shall be justified in writing by the head of the using agency. Heads of using agencies shall be responsible for ensuring that statutory or other prohibitions are not violated by use of installment provisions and that all budgetary or other required prior approvals are obtained. No agreement shall be used unless provision for installment payments is included in the solicitation document.

3-711 Contract Option.

(1) Provision. Any contract subject to an option for renewal, extension, or purchase, shall have had a provision to that effect included in the solicitation. When a contract is awarded by competitive sealed bidding, exercise of the option shall be at the purchasing agency's discretion only, and not subject to agreement or acceptance by the contractor.

(2) Exercise of Option. Before exercising any option for renewal, extension, or purchase, the procurement officer should attempt to ascertain whether a competitive procurement is practical, in terms of pertinent competitive and cost factors, and would be more advantageous to the purchasing agency than renewal or extension of the existing contract.

3-712 Technology Modification

(1) Technology Upgrade. Any contract subject to a modification for technological upgrades shall have had a provision to that effect included in the solicitation. Any modification to a contract for upgraded technology must be substantially within the scope of the original procurement or contract, and if both parties agree to the modification, then the contract may be modified.

2) New Technology. Any contract subject to a modification for technological upgrades shall have had a provision to that effect included in the solicitation. No contract modification for new technology requested by an acquiring agency shall be exercised without the approval required under Section 63F-1-205, the new technology modification has been subject to the review as described in R33-3-101(5) and the contracting parties agree to the modification.

(3) No contract may be extended beyond the term of the contract included in the solicitation except as provided in the Utah Procurement Code.

R33-3-8. Cost or Pricing Data and Analysis; Audits.

3-801 Scope.

This subpart sets forth the pricing policies which are applicable to contracts of any type and any included price adjustments when cost or pricing data are required to be submitted.

3-802 Requirements for Cost or Pricing Data.

(1) Submission of Cost or Pricing Data - Required. Cost or pricing data shall be required in support of a proposal leading to:

(a) the pricing of any contract expected to exceed $100,000 to be awarded by competitive sealed proposals or sole source procurement; or

(b) the pricing of any adjustment to any contract, including a contract, awarded by competitive sealed bidding, whether or not cost pricing data was required in connection with the initial pricing of the contract, as requested by the procurement officer. However, this requirement shall not apply when unrelated and separately priced adjustments for which cost or pricing data would not be required are consolidated for administrative convenience.

(2) Submission of Cost or Pricing Data - Permissive. After making determination that circumstances warrant action, the procurement officer may require the offeror or contractor to submit cost or pricing data in any other situation except where the contract award is made pursuant to competitive sealed bidding. Generally, cost or pricing data should not be required where the contract or modification is less than $2,000. Moreover, when less than complete cost analysis will provide a reasonable pricing result on awards or for change orders without the submission of complete cost or pricing data, the procurement officer shall request only that data considered adequate to support the limited extent of the cost analysis needed and need not require certification.

(3) Exceptions. Cost or pricing data need not be submitted and certified:

(a) where the contract price is based on:

(i) adequate price competition;

(ii) established catalog prices or market prices, if trade discounts are reflected in the prices; or

(iii) prices set by law or rule; or

(b) when the procurement officer determines in writing that the requirements for submitting cost or pricing data may be waived and the reasons for the waiver are stated in the determination. A copy of the determination shall be kept in the contract file and made available to the public upon request. If, after cost or pricing data were initially requested and received, it is determined that adequate price competition does exist, the data need not be certified.

If, despite the existence of an established catalog price or market price, the procurement officer considers that a price appears unreasonable, cost or pricing data may be requested. Where the reasonableness of the price can be assured by limited data pertaining to the differences in the item or services, requests should be so limited.

3-803 Submission of Cost or Pricing Data and Certification.

Cost or pricing data shall be submitted to the procurement officer at the time and in the manner prescribed in these rules or as otherwise from time to time prescribed by the procurement officer. When the procurement officer requires the offeror or contractor to submit cost or pricing data in support of any proposal, the data shall either be actually submitted or specifically identified in writing. When cost or pricing data is required, the data is to be submitted prior to beginning price negotiation and the offeror or contractor is required to keep the submission current throughout the negotiations. The offeror or contractor shall certify, as soon as practicable after agreement is reached on price, that the cost or pricing data submitted is accurate, complete, and current as of a mutually determined date prior to reaching agreement. Certification shall be made using the certificate set forth in section 3-804 of this subpart. A refusal by the offeror to supply the required data shall be referred to the procurement officer whose duty shall be to determine in writing whether to disqualify the noncomplying offeror, to defer award pending further investigation, or to enter into the contract. A refusal by a contractor to submit the required data to support a price adjustment shall be referred to the procurement officer who shall determine in writing whether to further investigate the price adjustment, not to allow any price adjustment, or to set the amount of the price adjustment.

3-804 Certificate of Current Cost or Pricing Data.

(1) Form of Certificate. When cost or pricing data must be certified, the certificate set forth below shall be included in the contract file along with any award documentation required under these rules. The offeror or contractor shall be required to submit the certificate as soon as practicable after agreement is reached on the contract price or adjustment.

"CERTIFICATE OF CURRENT COST OR PRICING DATA

This is to certify that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, cost or pricing data as defined in the Utah Procurement Rules submitted, either actually or by specific identification in writing, to the procurement officer in support of . . ., are accurate, complete, and current as of date, month and year. . . The effective date shall be the date when price negotiations were concluded and the contract price was agreed to. The responsibility of the offeror or contractor is not limited by the personal knowledge of the offeror's or contractor's negotiator if the offeror or contractor had information reasonably available at the time of agreement, showing that the negotiated price is not based on accurate, complete, and current data.

This certification includes the cost or pricing data supporting any advance agreement(s) between the offeror and the purchasing agency which are part of the proposal.

Firm

Name

Title

Date of Execution . . . (This date should be as close as practical to the date when the price negotiations were concluded and the contract price was agreed to.)"

(End of Certificate)

(2) Limitation of Representation. Because the certificate pertains to cost or pricing data, it is not to be construed as a representation as to the accuracy of the offeror's or contractor's judgment on the estimated portion of future costs or projections. It does, however, apply to the data upon which the offeror's or contractor's judgment is based. A certificate of current cost or pricing data is not a substitute for examination and analysis of the offeror's or contractor's proposal.

(3) Inclusion of Notice and Contract Clause. Whenever it is anticipated that a certificate of current cost or pricing data may be required, a clause giving notice of this requirement shall be included in the solicitation. If a certificate is required, the contract shall include a clause giving the purchasing agency a contract right to a price adjustment, that is, to a reduction in the price to what it would have been if the contractor had submitted accurate, complete, and current data.

(4) Exercise of Option. The exercise of an option at the price established in the initial negotiation in which certified cost or pricing data were used does not require recertification or further submission of data.

3-805 Defective Cost or Pricing Data.

(1) Overstated Cost or Pricing Data. If certified cost or pricing data is subsequently found to have been inaccurate, incomplete, or noncurrent as of the date stated in the certificate, the purchasing agency shall be entitled to an adjustment of the contract price, including profit or fee, to exclude any significant sum by which the price, including profit or fee, was increased because of the defective data. It is assumed that overstated cost or pricing data increased the contract price in the amount of the defect plus related overhead and profit or fee. Unless there is a clear indication that the defective data were not used or relied upon, the price should be reduced in this amount. In establishing that the defective data caused an increase in the contract price, the procurement officer is not expected to reconstruct the negotiation by speculating as to what would have been the mental attitudes of the negotiating parties if the correct data had been submitted at the time of agreement on price.

(2) Understated Cost or Pricing Data. In determining the amount of an adjustment, the contractor shall be entitled to an adjustment for any understated cost or pricing data submitted in support of price negotiations for the same pricing action up to the amount of the purchasing agency's claim for over stated cost or pricing data arising out of the same pricing action.

(3) Dispute as to Amount. If the contractor and the procurement officer cannot agree as to the amount of adjustment due to defective cost or pricing data, the procurement officer shall set an amount in accordance with subsections 3-805(1) and 3-805(2) of this subpart.

3-806 Price Analysis Techniques.

Price analysis is used to determine if a price is reasonable and acceptable. It involves a comparison of the prices for the same or similar items or services. Examples of price analysis criteria include:

(1) price submissions of other prospective bidders or offerors;

(2) prior price quotations and contract prices charged by any bidder, offeror, or contractor;

(3) prices published in catalogs or price lists; and

(4) prices available on the open market.

In making an analysis, consideration must be given to any differing delivery factors and contractual provisions, terms and conditions.

3-807 Cost Analysis Techniques.

(1) General. Cost analysis includes the appropriate verification of cost or pricing data, and the use of this data to evaluate:

(a) specific elements of costs;

(b) the necessity for certain costs;

(c) the reasonableness of amounts estimated for the necessary costs;

(d) the reasonableness of allowances for contingencies;

(e) the basis used for allocation of indirect costs;

(f) the appropriateness of allocations of particular indirect costs to the proposed contract; and

(g) the reasonableness of the total cost or price.

(2) Evaluations. Evaluations of cost or pricing data should include comparisons of costs and prices of an offeror's cost estimates with those of other offerors and any independent price and cost estimates. They shall also include consideration of whether the costs are reasonable and allocable under these rules.

3-808 Audit.

(1) The procurement officer may, at reasonable times and places, audit or cause to be audited, the books and records of a contractor, prospective contractor, subcontractor, or prospective subcontractor which are related to:

(a) the cost or pricing data submitted;

(b) a contract, including subcontracts, other than a firm fixed-price contract, awarded pursuant to these rules and the Utah Procurement Code.

(2) An audit performed by an auditor selected or approved by the procurement officer shall be submitted containing at least the following information:

(a) for cost and pricing data audits:

(i) a description of the original proposal and all submissions of cost or pricing data;

(ii) an explanation of the basis and the method used in preparing the proposal;

(iii) a statement identifying any cost or pricing data not submitted but examined by the auditor which has a significant affect on the proposed cost or price;

(iv) a description of any deficiency in the cost or pricing data submitted and an explanation of its affect on the proposal;

(v) a statement summarizing those major points where there is a disagreement as to the cost or pricing data submitted; and

(vi) a statement identifying any information obtained from other sources;

(b) the number of invoices or reimbursement vouchers submitted by the contractor or subcontractor for payment;

(c) the use of federal assistance funds; or

(d) the fluctuation of market prices affecting the contract.

The scope of the audit may be limited by the procurement officer.

(3) For contract audits, the scope of the report will depend on the scope of the audit ordered. However, the report should contain specific reference to the terms of the contract to which the audited data relates and a statement of the degree to which the auditor believes the audited data evidence compliance with those terms.

3-809 Retention of Books and Records.

(1) Relating to Cost and Pricing Data. Any contractor who receives a contract, change order, or contract modification for which cost or pricing data is required shall maintain the books and records that relate to the cost or pricing data for three years from the date of final payment under the contract.

(2) Relating to Other than Firm Fixed-Price Contracts. Books and records that relate to a contract in excess of $25,000, including subcontracts, other than a firm fixed-price contract, shall be maintained:

(a) by a contractor, for three years from the date of final payment under the contract; and

(b) by a subcontractor, for three years from the date of final payment under the subcontract.

R33-3-9. Plant or Site Inspection; Inspection of Supplies or Services.

3-901 Inspection of Plant or Site.

Circumstances under which the purchasing agency may perform inspections include inspections of the contractor's plant or site in order to determine:

(1) whether the standards set forth in section 3-601 have been met or are capable of being met; and

(2) if the contract is being performed in accordance with its terms.

3-902 Access to Plant or Place of Business.

The purchasing agency may enter a contractor's or subcontractor's plant or place of business to:

(1) inspect supplies or services for acceptance by the purchasing agency pursuant to the terms of a contract;

(2) audit cost or pricing data or audit the books and records of any contractor or subcontractor pursuant to Section 63G-6-415 subsection (5) of the Utah Procurement Code; and

(3) investigate in connection with an action to debar or suspend a person from consideration for award of contracts pursuant to Section 63G-6-804 of the Utah Procurement Code.

3-903 Inspection of Supplies and Services.

(1) Provisions for Inspection. Contracts may provide that the purchasing agency may inspect supplies and services at the contractor's or subcontractor's facility and perform tests to determine whether they conform to solicitation requirements or, after award, to contract requirements, and are acceptable. These inspections and tests shall be conducted in accordance with the terms of the solicitation and contract.

(2) Trial Use and Testing. The procurement officer is authorized to establish operational procedures governing the testing and trial use of various equipment, materials, and supplies by any using agency, and the relevance and use of resulting information to specifications and procurements.

3-904 Conduct of Inspections.

(1) Inspectors. Inspections or tests shall be performed so as not to unduly delay the work of the contractor or subcontractor. No inspector may change any provision of the specifications or the contract without written authorization of the procurement officer. The presence or absence of an inspector shall not relieve the contractor or subcontractor from any requirements of the contract.

(2) Location. When an inspection is made in the plant or place of business of a contractor or subcontractor, the contractor or subcontractor shall provide without charge all reasonable facilities and assistance for the safety and convenience of the person performing the inspection or testing.

(3) Time. Inspection or testing of supplies and services performed at the plant or place of business of any contractor or subcontractor shall be performed at reasonable times.

3-905 Inspection of Construction Projects.

On-site inspection of construction shall be performed in accordance with the terms of the contract.

KEY

government purchasing

Date of Enactment or Last Substantive Amendment

October 24, 2013

Notice of Continuation

July 2, 2012

Authorizing, Implemented, or Interpreted Law

63G-6


Additional Information

Contact

For questions regarding the content or application of rules under Title R33, please contact the promulgating agency (Administrative Services, Purchasing and General Services). A list of agencies with links to their homepages is available at http://www.utah.gov/government/agencylist.html or from http://www.rules.utah.gov/contact/agencycontacts.htm.